civil rights tagged pages

YWCA dining room sheltered honest conversation in days of racial strife

The modest room at the front of the YWCA on Augusta Street seems an unlikely relic of Greenville's civil rights past. From afar, the small space that once held the Y's dining room looks like a typical meeting room, with tables, slightly worn chairs and ...

Council incubated many of county's black leaders

Some call organization founded in 1971 one of the most effective civil rights groups of its time

Many Greenvillians may not remember its name, or even that it ever existed at all. But in the 1970s, it was 80 members strong. And its roll ...

Courthouse represents dark page in history

The National Register of Historic Places classifies structures in three categories: important to the nation (Fort Sumter or Mount Vernon, for example), to a state or to a locality.

While more than 30 Greenville buildings are listed on the Register, only one, the old ...

Old Allen School traces its roots to school for freedmen's children

Abandoned 40 years ago and ignored by busy Stone Avenue traffic, the old schoolhouse perches awkwardly near Richland Cemetery. Yet thousands of black children once studied there, and its name — Allen — reverberates through Greenville's educational history.

Its long story begins in October ...

Jesse Jackson and Sterling High classmates played pivotal role in civil rights

It started with a simple belief, but it proved to be revolutionary.

"We were convinced that there was nothing wrong with us," the Rev. Jesse Jackson said of his classmates at Sterling High School half a century ago. "Something was wrong with the society." ...

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Library sit-in by 'Greenville Eight' a 'defining moment' for civil rights here

The wave of rebellion was beginning to swell across the American South. They were young, idealistic and passionate, hungry to mold a lasting, more-dignified history for their race and culture.

And they no longer wanted their black skin color to deny them the right ...

Greenville's 'Big Idea' looked at way blacks lived

Sixty years ago, black people here were relegated to lives of blatant inequality, as "Everybody's Business," a report published by the Community Council of Greater Greenville in May 1950, makes clear.

Funded by the Community Chest, predecessor of the United Way, this study of ...

Take a stroll downtown to connect with Greenville's civil rights struggle

Those born after the baby boom generation may not realize the significance of the old Woolworth building that's slowly being demolished at the corner of Washington and North Main streets. But Ruth Ann Butler assures there is history in the growing pile of rubble.

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Jackie Robinson's 1959 Greenville visit set change in motion

Years later it would be called the turning point in Greenville's Civil Rights struggle, the moment by which events are measured before and after.

On New Year's Day in 1960, about 1,000 people converged on Greenville's Municipal Airport with a demand for change. ...

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South Carolina's last lynching foreshadowed changing times

By ones and twos, the coupes and sedans, taxis and private cars eased out of Greenville, unnoticed in the chill darkness of the wee hours, some edging along West Court Street where sheriff's deputies came and went from their first-floor headquarters.

They would assemble ...

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Woolworth's building gives way to Greenville's growth

The walls of the Woolworth's are gone now, torn asunder by heavy machinery as the future of downtown Greenville presses forward.

The destruction was a long time coming — and in a way began half a century ago when the figurative walls that hid ...

In 1959, Greenville was poised for big changes

By Judith Bainbridge

Greenville 50 years ago. Ancient history or only yesterday?

It was, as it had been for more than a half-century, a segregated and conservative cotton mill town, but with its busy downtown and nearby military base, Greenville in 1959 also ...

 
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