historic tagged pages

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Historic Poinsett Bridge completed in 1820

The historic Poinsett Bridge and the road across the mountains were of major economic importance to the county and state in the early 19th century.

It was the first road to link with the mountainous regions, and the bridge is on the National Register ...

Long history hugs Greenville-Pickens Speedway's curves

More than three decades after NASCAR left it in the red clay, the heart of Southern stock car racing beats as strong as ever at Greenville-Pickens Speedway.

March 19, 2005, marked the start of its 60th season -- nearly 50 under the same owner ...

Scots, Scots-Irish among Greenville's first settlers

There are 29 columns of "Mc" and "Mac" names in our telephone directory. From McAbbie to McZeno, Celtic prefixes dominate the surnames in this county; Greenville is a Scots-Irish stronghold.

Every "Mac" in town (and a lot of non-Macs, too) should turn out -- ...

Old Stone Church Cemetery

Revolutionary War figure and Pickens County namesake Gen. Andrew Pickens is among those buried in an historic cemetery at Old Stone Church, on U.S. 76 in Clemson.

The Presbyterian Church was built in 1797 by early Upstate settlers.

Greenville County Historical Society

A fascination with art history lured SidneyThompson to major in art at the University of South Carolina. And, after moving to Greenville in 1971, Thompson turned her attention to Greenville history -- first as a Tours Around Greenville guide and now as executive director of ...

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Poinsett Club site started as private residence a century ago

When Lewis Parker spent $5,500 for slightly more than four acres of land in the new Boyce Lawn subdivision in 1902, he was making, he thought, a fortunate investment in the future.

Five years earlier, the Goldsmith Realty Company had platted lots and named ...

Poinsett Hotel rose from Mansion House's rich past

For exactly a hundred years, the Mansion House was a Greenville landmark.

From 1824, when William Toney welcomed his first guests to the gleaming new hostelry, until 1924, when, dilapidated and outdated, it was demolished to make way for the Poinsett Hotel, it was ...

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Updates keep Sears home true to itself

When shopping for their dream home, the original owners of the brown and white Arts and Crafts bungalow in Greenville's Park Avenue area might have seen the words, “Some assembly required.”

That's because the 1,200-square-foot, two-bedroom home wasn't sold by a real- estate agent, ...

YWCA dining room sheltered honest conversation in days of racial strife

The modest room at the front of the YWCA on Augusta Street seems an unlikely relic of Greenville's civil rights past. From afar, the small space that once held the Y's dining room looks like a typical meeting room, with tables, slightly worn chairs and ...

Woodside Building once the tallest in Carolinas

"I am," John T. Woodside said in 1917, "the richest man in Greenville."

And he probably was. As president of the Woodside Cotton Mills, he and his three brothers owned the 112,000-spindle Woodside Mill in Greenville, "the largest complete cotton mill in the United ...

Masonic Hall is Greenville's forgotten skyscraper

Trick question: What was Greenville's first skyscraper?

Best response: Define "skyscraper."

While there's no standard definition of the term, most architects would probably agree that any building rising at least 150 feet above street level – 12 to 14 stories – that has ...

Caesars Head Hotel

Solomon Jones, tradition says, followed a pig's trail to find the easiest route up the mountain to Caesars Head. Then it took the master builder eight years to complete the 5-mile link between Greenville and Transylvania County, N.C. But the result, the Jones Gap Road, ...

Trinity Lutheran remains 'miniature cathedral'

Three men met on a street corner one Sunday afternoon in 1909, and a church was conceived. The men were Thomas M. Wells, a stonemason; Dr. Henry Schade, an optometrist; and Allen B. Caughman, a bookkeeper. The corner was Washington and Main streets in downtown ...

Come aboard Greenville's 'Union Station'

When Greenville's "Union Station" on West Washington Street was completed in 1905, it was a thing of beauty. Unfortunately, it did not remain a joy forever. By the time it was demolished in 1988, the depot bore only a faint resemblance to its glory days, ...

Lesser-known Vardry McBee III was a young Turk, a talented musician

Vardry McBee III was a xylophone prodigy, a vaudevillian, an almost-famous musician. The great-great-grandson of Greenville's founder learned his skills not at his father's knee, but in his orchestra pit.

Musical – or at least show business – talent evidently ran in the ...

'The Alamo' warehouse one of oldest commercial buildings

On summer evenings, crowds surge into Fluor Stadium in the West End as traffic inches along refurbished and renamed "South Main Street." (To purists, it will always be Pendleton Street.) Perhaps a few wonder about the old brick building across the street.

They should. ...

SC Web site details our entries on National Register of Historic Places

South Carolina maintains a complete listing of state sites on the National Register of Historic Places.

The site is searchable by county and includes both details about the site as well as the original nomination form.

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John C. Calhoun

In 1825, American statesman John C. Calhoun moved to an estate that is now home to the campus of Clemson University. The school was founded by his son-in-law, Thomas Green Clemson.

Calhoun served twice as vice president, in the Cabinet, the U.S. Senate and ...

'Thirteen Days' stirs memories of man who was hero and friend

Seeing the current movie "Thirteen Days" about the Cuban Missile Crisis brought back both pleasant and sad memories about Rudolf Anderson Jr. He was not only the single casualty of that showdown between the U.S. and Soviet Union, he was a hero to many, including ...

Greenville history, development entwined with mill villages

Greenville’s history and development is intertwined with 30 mill villages (10 in the Greenville city limits) that once were landmarks and community-defining workplaces.

Within Greenville, the communities that were built around the mills of American Spinning, Brandon, City View, Dunean, Judson, Mills Mill, Monaghan, ...

Parker High garnered national attention as education model

The close of Parker High in 2003 ended an era that remains a source of pride for many Greenville County residents.

When shifting populations left too few students for the sprawling (147,676-square-foot) old building near Monaghan Mill, the end came for a school that ...

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Campbell's Covered Bridge state's only surviving covered bridge

Campbell's Covered Bridge, located of State 414 in northern Greenville County, is the state’s only surviving covered bridge.

Measuring 35 feet long and 12 feet wide, the bridge was built in 1909 after a torrential summer rainstorm the previous year washed out nearly every ...

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Businessman Vardry McBee known as Father of Greenville

Vardry McBee (1775-1864) was a businessman, philanthropist and industrialist who built a textile mill along the banks of the Reedy River.

Known as the Father of Greenville, McBee is credited with constructing more than 100 buildings in Greenville County.

McBee gave land to ...

Presidential visits have been brief here

Greenville hasn't spent much time in the presidential limelight. It was too poor, too small, too distant, too Southern and too solidly Democratic to rate national political attention until the 1960s. Since then, jet planes, super-charged campaigning and increased prosperity have brought wayfaring Republicans and ...

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Built in 1813, Whitehall is Greenville's oldest home

Whitehall was built in 1813 by Henry Middleton on what would become Earle Street.

This Lowcountry planter and his large family were anxious to escape from their Ashley River plantation to a healthier climate in the summer months.

Middleton, who was born in ...

 
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