historic tagged pages

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Joel R. Poinsett was a physician, botanist and American statesman

Joel Roberts Poinsett (March 2, 1779-December 12, 1851) was a member of the United States House of Representatives, the first United States Minister to Mexico (the United States did not appoint ambassadors until 1896), a U.S. Secretary of War under Martin Van Buren and a ...

Community Foundation helped lay groundwork for modern Greenville

In May 1956, eight members of a newly appointed Community Council sub-committee started planning Greenville's future.

Charged with setting up a community foundation, the cream of the city's business leadership -- Charlie Daniel, Alester Furman III, Eugene Bryant, W.W. McEachern, Ernest Patton, Clement ...

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Poinsett's rebirth recalled its history

Hotel Greenville, as it was first called, was a local project.

After the third Southern Textile Exposition in 1919, it was clear that the city needed a new hotel; there weren't enough rooms for all the visitors.

After the fourth, in 1921, the ...

Council incubated many of county's black leaders

Some call organization founded in 1971 one of the most effective civil rights groups of its time

Many Greenvillians may not remember its name, or even that it ever existed at all. But in the 1970s, it was 80 members strong. And its roll ...

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A walk up Main Street is a tour through history

You've attended its festivals. You've lunched, wined, and dined at its shaded sidewalk tables. You have window-shopped its boutiques, browsed at Bentley's, sampled ice cream at the Creamery, listened to jazz at the Hyatt.

You know Main Street. But you haven't really seen it ...

Courthouse represents dark page in history

The National Register of Historic Places classifies structures in three categories: important to the nation (Fort Sumter or Mount Vernon, for example), to a state or to a locality.

While more than 30 Greenville buildings are listed on the Register, only one, the old ...

Old Allen School traces its roots to school for freedmen's children

Abandoned 40 years ago and ignored by busy Stone Avenue traffic, the old schoolhouse perches awkwardly near Richland Cemetery. Yet thousands of black children once studied there, and its name — Allen — reverberates through Greenville's educational history.

Its long story begins in October ...

Jesse Jackson and Sterling High classmates played pivotal role in civil rights

It started with a simple belief, but it proved to be revolutionary.

"We were convinced that there was nothing wrong with us," the Rev. Jesse Jackson said of his classmates at Sterling High School half a century ago. "Something was wrong with the society." ...

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Library sit-in by 'Greenville Eight' a 'defining moment' for civil rights here

The wave of rebellion was beginning to swell across the American South. They were young, idealistic and passionate, hungry to mold a lasting, more-dignified history for their race and culture.

And they no longer wanted their black skin color to deny them the right ...

Important dates in Greenville's history dating from 1768

1768 -- Richard Pearis settles near Reedy River in Greenville

1786 - Greenville County established by act of state Legislature

1795 - U.S. Post Office opens in Greenville village

1813 - Whitehall, the oldest house in Greenville, built by Gov. ...

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Amid changes, Donaldson Center plays vital role

Named in honor of Capt. John Owen Donaldson, a Greenville High and Furman University graduate who Greenville native and decorated World War I pilot, the Donaldson Center – now officially known as the South Carolina Technology & Aviation Center (SCTAC) – is the site of ...

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Greenville's Textile Hall built to host Textile Expositions

From the time Greenville began serving as host for the Southern (and later the International) Textile Exposition in 1915 until the show made its final appearance in 1962, Greenville earned the reputation as the textile center of the world.

The Textile show, which displayed ...

Pete Hollis' contributions to education made him a hero

Pete Hollis' story should inspire the "C" students of the world -- or at least console their parents.

Lawrence Peter Hollis was poorly prepared academically for the rigors of the University of South Carolina when he entered in 1901. The farm boy from Chester ...

Revolutionary War figure Richard Pearis namesake of Paris Mountain

Richard Pearis (1725 – 1794) was an Indian trader, a pioneer settler of Upstate South Carolina, and a Loyalist officer during the American Revolution.

Born in Ireland in 1725, he was 10 years old when his family immigrated to the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. ...

Downtown churches don't form a cross

Do Greenville's church locations form a cross?

Did Vardry McBee donate land by accident or design to create a cruciform (a fancy word for cross-shaped) pattern?

It is one of Greenville's most enduring legends. And like so many legends, it is absolutely wrong. ...

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Fort Hill plantation home on Clemson campus once home to John C. Calhoun

Fort Hill, an antebellum plantation home on the Clemson University campus, was the home of American statesman John C. Calhoun from 1825 until his death in 1850.

The estate passed to his daughter, Anna, and her husband, Thomas Green Clemson, founder of Clemson ...

Green Valley Country Club celebrates 50 years in 2008

Alester G. Furman Jr. loved "his" university, his hometown and golf. In the 1950s, on nearly 500 rolling acres west of Travelers Rest, those interests came together.

As chairman of Furman University's Board of Trustees and a Greenville Realtor since 1914, he had ...

These Greenville sports stars are worth remembering

OK, sports fans, this one's for you.

Test your baseball knowledge. Who was the native Greenvillian, born in 1890, who played for the Carolina League, was drafted by the major leagues in 1909 and played for National League teams until 1919?

If you ...

Greenville's 'Big Idea' looked at way blacks lived

Sixty years ago, black people here were relegated to lives of blatant inequality, as "Everybody's Business," a report published by the Community Council of Greater Greenville in May 1950, makes clear.

Funded by the Community Chest, predecessor of the United Way, this study of ...

Chick Springs drew entrepreneurs for nearly a century

Once upon a summer long ago, visitors flocked to Chick Springs.

Beginning in 1840 and continuing for almost a hundred years, despite wars and fires, the bubbling mineral springs near Taylors attracted ailing, marriageable and leisured South Carolinians to its hotels and cottages, its ...

Woods Lake swimming remembered decades after lake closed

For more than 20 years Woods Lake has been closed; its high sliding board and its lifeguard stand rusting in the same spot where a couple of generations of young people and families splashed and swam on lazy summer days.

Located on Woods Lake ...

Imperial Hotel was bustling for much of 20th century

A trio of hotels dominated Greenville's social and business life for nearly 50 years. For your favorite Aunt Agatha, you'd book a room at the hospitable Ottaray. To impress in-laws-to-be, a suite at the posh Poinsett was in order.

And after 1912, a ...

Mary's Record Shop proprietress Mary Mitchell dies

In January 2005, as Mary Mitchell and others watched the demolition of the South Main Street building that once housed Mary's Record Shop, the longtime Greenville resident lamented the loss of a landmark.

"It's part of Greenville's history," she told The Greenville News.

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Pelham Mill site of Greenville County's first textile mill

Pelham Mill, located along SC Highway 14 near Greer, is the site of the first textile mill in Greenville County. Built in 1820, the mill featured a stonework dam that is now the centerpiece of a historical park that includes walking trails.

The dam ...

Take a stroll downtown to connect with Greenville's civil rights struggle

Those born after the baby boom generation may not realize the significance of the old Woolworth building that's slowly being demolished at the corner of Washington and North Main streets. But Ruth Ann Butler assures there is history in the growing pile of rubble.

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